Saturday, November 8, 2014

SBO Ultrasound

The GistAs mentioned in this post, the operating characteristics of historical and physical features are suboptimal in small bowel obstruction (SBO).  Bedside ultrasound has better operating characteristics and is one of the easier scans to perform and read.  Assuming others like to make their lives easier, I gave a talk on this; but professionals have created a tutorial at The Ultrasound Podcast tutorial.

I delivered a quick talk at the Controversies and Consensus in Emergency Medicine Conference on ultrasound for SBO, a modality that I've found great utility for in my developing practice. As a believer in Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM) and with hopes that, as a novice I might receive some constructive criticism to help me become better, I have posted the recording.



A Few Tidbits (some redundancy from prior post): 
Time.  Ultrasound for SBO is quick and easy and can be performed in conjunction with the history and physical exam in appropriate patients.  This may alleviate the time to definitive diagnosis (say CT or surgical evaluation), treatment, and/or disposition.*  Furthermore, sometimes we see things we don't expect on ultrasound.  Familiarity with US findings of SBO may make sense of dilated loops of bowel or altered peristalsis encountered during a gallbladder or aorta scan for abdominal pain.  Conversely, there are times when SBO may be suspected and a quick ultrasound may reveal an alternative diagnosis that may grossly change management (examples in talk).

X-rays are out for SBO.  Bedside ultrasound has better operating characteristics than plain films with fewer instances of equivocal results.  Sometimes plain films are crucial to evaluate for pneumoperitoneum but most patients with abdominal pain don't fall in this category.  Indeed, The American College of Radiology conclusion on plain films in suspected SBO
"In light of these inconsistent results, it is reasonable to expect that abdominal radiographs will not be definitive in many patients with a suspected SBO. It could prolong the evaluation period and add radiation exposure while often not obviating the need for additional examinations, particularly CT" [5].
Limitations.
  • Ileus vs. SBO - while US beats plain films with regard to percentage of ambiguous scans, ultrasounds can be equivocal as well.
  • Cause of obstruction/Transition point not well elucidated.  In patients with recurrent SBO from malignancy or adhesions and this may be less important to the managing team and surgeons often stop ordering CT scans if the presentation is consistent with prior presentations. 
  • Consultant access to images obtained at the bedside.
Note:  I have not included surgical consultants requiring a CT scan as part of the limitations.  The surgical literature recognizes the capacity of US to diagnose SBO, although this is not yet widely adopted [6].  However, despite common assumptions, surgeons don't require a CT scan for every recurrent SBO.  As a result, sometimes a positive ultrasound, followed by plain film, may be enough in these patients who will undergo conservative management.  Have a chat with each consultant, they're not always as inflexible as we make them out to be. 

*NCT02190981 pending with LOS as secondary outcome


References:
1.  Carpenter CR, Pines JM. The end of X-rays for suspected small bowel obstruction? Using evidence-based diagnostics to inform best practices in emergency medicine. Acad. Emerg. Med. 2013;20(6):618–20.
2.  Taylor MR, Lalani N. Adult small bowel obstruction. Acad. Emerg. Med. 2013;20(6):528–44.
3. Böhner H, Yang Q, Franke C, Verreet PR, Ohmann C. Simple data from history and physical examination help to exclude bowel obstruction and to avoid radiographic studies in patients with acute abdominal pain. Eur. J. Surg. 1998;164(10):777–84. 
4. Jang TB, Schindler D, Kaji AH.  Bedside ultrasonography for the detection of small bowel obstruction in the emergency department. Emerg Med J. 2011 Aug;28(8):676-8.
5. Katz DS, Baker ME, Rosen MP, Lalani T, et al, Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® suspected small-bowel obstruction. Reston (VA): American College of Radiology (ACR); 2013. 10 p.
6.  
Maung AA, Johnson DC, Piper GL et al. Evaluation and Management of Small-Bowel Obstruction.  J Trauma. 73(5):S362-S369, November 2012

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